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The E-Type (XK-E) Forum

Give me a Brake

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Wingnut2 Dale M
Corolla, NC, USA   USA
Could these braking issues be caused by a restricted rear rubber brake line?

1) I must push really hard on the brake pedal to slow the car down, quick stops not really possible.

2) Bleeding front calipers is normal, fluid flows easily with light pedal pressure. Bleeding back calipers, not so. Really hard pedal pressure needed to get any
fluid to flow when bleeding the rear calipers.

My 1970 E-type has a new master cylinder, new rebuilt front calipers, new rotors, new front rubber hoses, new hard lines up front. But nothing has been done to the back cage since I've had it. The rear (short) rubber line looks original. If it does have a restriction inside the hose, would this create my braking issues noted above?
Anyway, I ordered a new rear rubber hose yesterday (UK made) hoping to solve the hard pedal, poor braking, at least until I have time to drop and R&R the rear cage components. But what next if this does not change anything?

All thoughts welcome!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 2017-10-10 08:20 AM by Wingnut2.

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DAWTRIJAG Avatar
DAWTRIJAG David Warr
St. George's, NL, Canada   CAN
Hi Dale,
You could very well have a bad rubber brake hose. They can look ok on the outside but be blocked inside. You may possibly have stuck pistons in the calipers although not likely all four would be stuck. That could be why you aren't getting any bleeding action. In looking at the rear rotors does it appear that there is any braking action going on there. The rotors will be flashed over with rust if the brakes aren't working at all.
David

Wingnut2 Dale M
Corolla, NC, USA   USA
Hi David
The rear discs do show some use, maybe from the hand brake that have been using to help slow down, assuming the wear would look similar to the caliper pads. Not as clean as the front, however. I'm not really getting a nose-dive when braking now, leading me to the restricted (but not completely blocked) rubber line guess.
Will post an update after the new hose arrives and is installed. Thanks for the post.

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DAWTRIJAG Avatar
DAWTRIJAG David Warr
St. George's, NL, Canada   CAN
Hi Dale,
When I bought our MK2 it was in quite rough shape. The car pulled violently to the right when the brakes were applied. It was the rubber hose on the left front. I am sure the original hoses were still on the car and it was just about forty years old then. New hoses all around cleared that up but the calipers needed work as well. A couple of years ago I put modern calipers on the car along with a more powerful booster from SNG Barratt. I have retained the original rear set up. It all works really well.
David

Wingnut2 Dale M
Corolla, NC, USA   USA
Hi David
The rear calipers, as well as the differential, will be taken apart and redone when I drop and service the cage sometime this winter.
I'm still looking for a ring and pinion that will improve the RPM's on the freeway. My stock setup turns @2500 at 55 MPH in 4th gear, and spins itself silly at 70+ MPH.
I am thinking about a 2.88 ratio, which would reduce engine turns at highway speeds. I'm hoping to get a little bit better gas milage with it as well. I would much rather drive the E-Type to events rather than trailer it, as I do now. Will ask the members for a ring and pinion source later in a new thread.

DAWTRIJAG Avatar
DAWTRIJAG David Warr
St. George's, NL, Canada   CAN
Hi Dale,
That seems like an abnormally high rpm for that speed. I don't recall our E-Type being that buzzy at such a low speed and it was a USA car with the lower gear ratio than the British or European diff. We sold the E-Type last year after over thirty years of ownership.
I wonder could there be another issue. If not you may have to source a European diff.
David

Wingnut2 Dale M
Corolla, NC, USA   USA
Hi David
What I've learned is that I probably have the 3.54 / 1 ratio now (US car). From some specs I've read, this creates @3200 RMM at 70 MPH.
If a 2.88 were installed, the RPMs at 70 would be reduced to @2500 RPMs. The speedometer would also need to be re-calibrated for correct the speed to show, however. I'm not sure how this speedo calibration is achieved on the E-type.
Years ago, I ordered a 5-speed new truck, standard transmission) with the lowest gearing possible that they offered, and found that I achieved a bit better gas milage than sticker-advertised. In 5th gear at 70 MPH, it turns @2100 RPM. Now, 25 years later, I'm still driving this truck, and with over 300,000 miles on it, I'm thinking the better gas milage and longevity of the engine had something to do with the lower gearing. Just my thinking.

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DAWTRIJAG Avatar
DAWTRIJAG David Warr
St. George's, NL, Canada   CAN
HI Dale,
You are correct I am sure. Reduced revs would be great and the E-Type would still accelerate well.
David

M. Personne John T
Champagne, Dordogne, France   FRA
Hi Dale.

I fitted a 2.88 diff to my 1969 FHC late last year and the reduction in revs, from a 3.54, makes it a different car. OK, 1st gear has to be slipped a little to move off but with so much torque there's no noticeable change in acceleration in the higher gears.

Do it and you won't regret it.

John

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Wingnut2 Dale M
Corolla, NC, USA   USA
Finally returning to topic:
The new rear rubber brake line hose was installed and the rear brakes then bled fluid as they were supposed to.
Can't tell if the old line was bad internally- compressed air goes through it easily. I've read that fluid pressure, not air, can collapse the hose inside.
Anyway, braking seems somewhat improved, perhaps sort of like washing a car makes the car run better?
Just curious- is anyone out there happy with the braking of your E-type (if you have not upgraded the original)?

DAWTRIJAG Avatar
DAWTRIJAG David Warr
St. George's, NL, Canada   CAN
Hi Dale,
I always found that our 64 E Type braked well with the original set up. Also our MK2 braked well. The problem with the original set up was that the pads are so small that they seem to wear out quickly and the cylinders were very prone to corrosion. The pistons hold the seal whereas modern brakes have the seal in the cylinder. The pistons are cheaper and easier to change than the cylinder. I upgraded the MK2 to modern calipers for the front and improved booster basically because it was a better option than machining the old calipers . I retained the original rear set up. The car stops a lot better now.
David

Wingnut2 Dale M
Corolla, NC, USA   USA
Thanks for responding, David. I don't remember any of my various 60's cars having such poor braking as this E-type. I plan to drop the rear cage after the holidays, restoring the rear calipers and changing the gear ratio of the differential. When doing so, I will take before and after pics and add to this forum (if anyone is interested). Front calipers have already been restored (along with everything else under the bonnet) 4 years ago. All front braking parts were replaced or restored at that time, which is why you may be correct in suspecting limited travel pistons/pads on the back calipers.

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